Thursday, October 29, 2015

Irenka




Looking for some nice new art work for office.  Maybe something with Elvis in it. Or dogs playing cards.


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Top News
From left, John Kasich, Mike Huckabee, Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, Donald J. Trump, Ben Carson and Carly Fiorina at the Republican debate Wednesday night at the University of Colorado Boulder.
G.O.P. Candidates Take Sharp Tone in Third Debate

By PATRICK HEALY and JONATHAN MARTIN

In a change from previous debates, the candidates dove into the gritty details of economic plans and entitlement programs, but exchanges grew contentious and political friendships were strained.
. Transcript of the Debate
. Highlights and Analysis
President Obama and other officials in the Situation Room on the day of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden. A classified document in front of Hillary Rodham Clinton was blurred before this photo was released.
How 4 Federal Lawyers Paved the Way to Kill Osama bin Laden

By CHARLIE SAVAGE

The lawyers tried to prepare for any legal obstacles - and made it all but inevitable that Bin Laden would be killed, not captured.

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Courts struggle to sort out meaning of emoticons and emoji


Emojis
Image from Shutterstock.
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Keyboard-crafted emoticons and digital emoji are becoming an issue in court cases, where judges are asked to decide whether the symbols affect the meaning of texts and emails.
Emoticons such as “:-P” denoting a stuck-out tongue and “;)” denoting a wink are particularly tricky for courts, Slate reports in a story noted by Above the Law. Slate summarizes several cases, including these:
• A University of Michigan law student sued a female classmate who reported he was stalking and harassing her, along with the school and police for launching an investigation. No charges were ever brought. He argued his texts to a friend saying he wanted to make the classmate “feel crappy” and experience depression shouldn’t have been taken seriously, in part because he used an emoticon indicating a stuck-out tongue. A federal judge in Michigan found the emoticon didn’t materially alter the meaning of the text.
• In August, a Delaware judge interpreted a winking emoticon used in a text in which a man boasted about surprising a woman by purchasing a plane ticket so he could be seated next to her on a flight to Paris. The man said the wink showed he was joking; the judge said the emoticon showed he was amused by the opportunity to harass the woman.
• A Michigan appeals court ruled last year that a post to an online message board about corruption wasn’t defamatory because it included a tongue-out emoji, indicating the post was a joke.
• Lawyers for Anthony Elonis, convicted under a federal threats law for his Facebook posts,persuaded the U.S. Supreme Court that prosecutors had to prove intent in his prosecution. Part of Elonis’ defense was that his use of the stuck-out tongue emoticon showed he didn’t actually intend to harm his wife.
• A Texas man accused of a sexual assault in 2011 argued the victim had consented to sex, partly through texts using a winking face emoticon. The judge disagreed.


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elisi





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Former prosecutor admits covering up assault of handcuffed suspect

Oct 28, 2015, 4:25 pm CDT


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Criminal lawyer accused of charging clients $1M for 'guaranteed' dismissals gets 15 years


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A Texas criminal defense attorney was sentenced by a federal judge on Tuesday to 15 years in a conspiracy that, according to trial testimony, involved bilking clients of big bucks for bribes that were never paid.
Abraham Moses Fisch, 56, through his defense counsel, made last-minute arguments to delay sentencing, to reduce the prison term and to be allowed to turn himself in later rather than be handcuffed and taken into custody in the courtroom.
But the judge said Fisch had to begin serving his sentence right away in the Houston case, citing “obvious risks” to allowing him to remain free on bond, reports the Houston Chronicle.
Convicted by a jury in May of 18 charges including conspiracy, money laundering and failure to file tax returns, Fisch persuaded his clients to pay over $1 million for “guaranteed” dismissals, through the help of former clients and others said in trial testimony, a Department of Justice news release reported at that time. He was ordered to forfeit nearly $1.2 million.
On Tuesday, at his sentencing, Fisch called the criminal case “one of the most humbling experiences of my life,” the Chronicle reports. The judge permitted him to say goodbye to his wife and turn over personal items before he was taken away.
That was a courtesy not granted to her own son, Joey Herrera, one of Fisch’s former clients, when he also got a 15-year prison term, in 2009, in a federal drug case and was taken into custody in court, a woman who gave her name as S. Herrera, told the Chronicle. The two said in court documents that they paid Fisch $80,000 in cash, based on the attorney’s alleged claim that he could get Herrera released.
“I hope he feels exactly the anxiety, the loss and the helplessness that my son felt when they took him,” the mother said Tuesday of Fisch. “I feel karma. I feel that justice was done. I feel that maybe he should have gotten more. He knew what he was doing. He left people hanging.”
Hat tip: Associated Press




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Irenka












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