Saturday, February 6, 2016

It was ok to lie to frame him.



In fairness I have reached out to every famous person to get their side of the story, and their spokesmen  all say the same thing "Who are you?"

Soooo. If Donald loves America so much, could he just do a little service to his country by starting some place besides the top?  Let's see what he can really do  for us first besides shoot his arrogant mouth off.  Let's give him the post office or something.


You do realize that most ordinary citizens don't want to fight a war.  It's the world leaders who want this.  Sometimes they whip us into a frenzy... but mostly not.  Bet it's the same way with enemy countries. Their ordinary citizens want no part of a war.  I'll have to think about it all but I think the world would be better off if just our leaders sought to kill each other...you know....without our help. So all the ordinary citizens of the world could just concentrate on making our next car payment.


Not sure that I fully understand police discretion to give a ticket or not even if he knows the law has been violated.  Why aren't juries given the same right?

 I've been asked to give a fifteen minute warning so you can delete me before I post pictures of my lunch.  I understand....I just don't care.  

Scandal. 

Sanders Admits Receiving Free Checking from Big Banks

A chastened Sanders acknowledged receiving the benefit in exchange for maintaining a five-hundred-dollar minimum balance.


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Dershowitz: OJ Simpson's 'dream team' was actually a nightmare team

Feb 5, 2016, 8:47 am CST

“I think it was the first time the LA Police Department was caught doing what it had been doing for years and that is framing ‘guilty’ people,” Dershowitz said. “In their minds O.J. was guilty, and therefore it was OK to frame him.”

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Martin Shkreli pleads the Fifth, then tweets about 'imbeciles' in Congress




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Disappointed With Europe, Thousands of Iraqi Migrants Return Home

By TIM ARANGO

Many of the Iraqis who joined Syrians, Africans and Afghans in the great migrant wave to Europe last year with expectations of quick success are now turning around.


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You Could Be Seeing An Image Here!

Her dad thought her clean energy idea was just a 'kid's project.' He was wrong.

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http://www.today.com/style/supermodel-cheryl-tiegs-secrets-beauty-happiness-life-after-modeling-t71441

How come the photographers of revealing pictures of Cheryl Tiegs  and Christi Brinkly didn't get the same condemnation I do? I always try to put a catch light in the model's eyes...same as they did.


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LEGAL ETHICS

Is grievance filed over lawyer's blog post a 'lightweight defamation claim'?


blog post
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A Michigan psychiatrist who is a memberof the state’s attorney discipline board is seeking investigation of a lawyer’s blog post that questioned whether her expert testimony used “hatchet job tactics.”
The lawyer blogger, Steven Gursten, has posted at his Michigan Auto Law blog therequest for investigation (PDF) filed by disciplinary board member Rosalind Griffin. In the request, Griffin says Gursten’s statements “misrepresent my credentials, my testimony, and my character” and suggest that she committed perjury. The attorney discipline board functions as an appellate tribunal after a hearing panel rules in an ethics case.
The Consumer Law & Policy Blog notes the controversy and says it “amounts to a lightweight defamation claim” filed six days after the statute of limitations expired for a defamation lawsuit. “One might well question whether that is a sound use of public resources,” the consumer blog says, “and indeed whether the First Amendment is offended by letting Griffin burst free of the constraints imposed on defamation claims by state law and the First Amendment.”
Griffin had examined a client of Gursten’s who was injured in an auto accident. She was selected by the insurer for the defendant, Gursten says. “If Dr. Griffin has her way,” Gursten writes, “this blog post may be one of my last. But I’m not backing down.”
In the blog post at issue, Gursten wrote that doctors who conduct “independent medical exams” for auto insurers “do enormous damage to people, and they get away with it time and time again. But maybe not every time. Today I’ll discuss my cross-examination of Dr. Rosalind Griffin, who many attorneys regard as a rather notorious IME doctor in Michigan.”
Gursten goes on to list nine examples of Griffin’s testimony in his client’s lawsuit. “Decide for yourself whether my top 9 ‘hatchet job’ tactics were used by Dr. Griffin in my case,” he writes. In the first example, Gursten writes, “Did Dr. Griffin lie in her IME report and during her videotaped deposition by specifically claiming [Gursten’s client] made ‘statements’ to her that ‘he has been improving’ or that ‘he has improved’?”
Gursten said Griffin’s examination of his client had been recorded, and when Gursten pressed Griffin for details, she said the client’s statements about improving were “not a quote.”
Griffin did not immediately respond to a voice mail message seeking comment. Alan Gershel, the grievance administrator for the Attorney Grievance Commission, said Michigan court rules prevent him from commenting on matters that may be pending.






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Clinton: I Cannot Be Part Of The “Establishment” As A Woman Running For President

by jonathanturley
225px-Hillary_Clinton_official_Secretary_of_State_portrait_crop220px-nancy_pelosiDWSPortrait225px-dianne_feinstein_official_senate_photoI have found the Democratic debate really interesting to watch. For the first time in my lifetime, these debates actually have some substance and drama. There was a couple of interesting moments last night, including the suggestion by Hillary Clinton that it is out of bounds for Sanders to raise the money that she has taken from Wall Street as a "smear." However, the most interesting was Clinton saying that it was ridiculous to call her the "establishment" candidate because she is a woman. For many the Clintons are the personification of the establishment with huge donors, PACs, control of the DNC, and a massive political machine. Yet, Clinton's point is that she is also the trying to become the first woman president and thus must be considered an outsider candidate. It seemed to resonate with the crowd. I thought it would make for an interesting discussion on the blog.

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Israeli Minister Pushes New Law To Punish Those Who Question Israel’s Commitment to Democracy

by jonathanturley
MregevIsraeli Culture and Sports Minister (and former Brigadier General) Miri Regev has a curious view of democracy. Regev is the author of a “cultural loyalty” bill that would allow fines or withdrawing support for any institution for a host of free speech violations, including “the denial of Israel’s democratic nature.” Thus, the bill would allow Israel to punish those who challenge its commitment to democracy so that Israel can show that it is a democracy. Follow? Let's try again. If someone denies Israel is a true democracy, they will be punished of using their free speech to criticize the government. Well, the important thing is that it all makes sense to Regev. It is taken from the same oxymoronic lesson book as "the beatings will continue until morale improves" or "destroying a village to save it."
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Too true to be funny?


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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Texas police turn into 'mobile debt collectors' with license-reader program


police siren
Image from Shutterstock.
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A company that makes license-plate readers is offering free use of its equipment to Texas law enforcement agencies in exchange for a 25 percent surcharge on outstanding court fines collected through its database.
The deal turns Texas police in to “mobile debt collectors,” the Electronic Frontier Foundation says at its DeepLinks blog.
The blog says Vigilant Solutions is leveraging a new Teas law that allows officers to install credit card readers in their cars to take payment on the spot for court fines. In exchange for the license plate readers, Vigilant will get data on outstanding court fines. Vigilant will add the information to its database of license plate images and give it to police, who could use the data to find license plates associated with fees, the blog says.
When police pull a driver over, they can offer the driver the choice of arrest or immediate payment—plus a 25 percent processing fee for Vigilant. Already, Guadalupe County and the cities of Orange and Kyle are participating in the Vigilant program.
Fox7Austin covered the Kyle program and spoke with Wayne Krause Yang, legal director of the Texas Civil Rights Project. The law says that debt collection “is supposed to be direct and reasonable in its fees,” Krause Yang said. A 25 percent surcharge is “not reasonable and it’s not direct,” he said.
Vigilant spokesperson Josh Zecher tells the ABA Journal that the company isn’t performing debt collection services. “Vigilant is providing law enforcement with tools to collect fees and fines on their own,” he tells the ABA Journal in an email. “Vigilant’s fee is authorized by statute and is lower than the 30 percent fee that is statutorily mandated for those who perform debt collection in Texas—something again we do not do.”
Zecher says people apprehended under the “warrant redemption program” already have warrants out for their arrest, mostly for failure to appear. He says it’s cheaper to pay the processing fee than to go to jail and pay the costs of towing and impounding a vehicle.
His calculation: Those who don’t pay on the spot have to pay a $175 towing fee and a $20 daily impound fee, and they lose a day of work while in jail, giving up $96 in wages if pay is $12 an hour. The processing fee for paying a typical warrant fine of $500, on the hand, is $125.

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Self-driving cars will soon be street-legal, and California is getting a jump on regulating them

Feb 5, 2016, 8:30 am CST


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This is undoubtedly the closest any of us will ever get to the top of Mt. Everest.
KEEP AN EYE ON THE ELEVATION, LEFT SIDE OF YOUR COMPUTER SCREEN, AND THEN MOVE THE MOUSE WHEN YOU GET TO THE TOP TO SEE A PANORAMIC VIEW. Its almost like being there and there's a 360 degree view from the top!
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Lawyer faces false imprisonment charge over firing of worker

Feb 4, 2016, 2:40 pm CST


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Lawyer says he can't ask permission to release client list of 'DC Madam' because judge barred motion

Feb 4, 2016, 10:56 am CST




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COULD THIS COURT RULING ENDANGER WORKERS IN THE SHIP CHANNEL?






Javier Delgado had been welding for about an hour the morning of June 2, 2012, when his torch hit either oil or vapor still lingering in the pipe. The resulting explosion at Oiltanking Houston, a crude oil storage terminal in Channelview, was so forceful it decapitated Delgado, a father of three and senior welder with more than 20 years experience. The blast also shattered the arm of Delgado's assistant and seriously injured two more of Delgado's colleagues, all of whom worked for L-Con, a contractor that Oiltanking had called in to weld a flange on the 24-inch crude oil transport pipe. A cleanup crew worked throughout the night filling more than 20 boxes with human remains.
In the petrochemical epicenter of the United States, such grisly industrial accidents are unfortunately not uncommon. Shortly after the accident, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration swooped in, investigated and delivered a slap-on-the-wrist $14,000 fine for failing to implement industry-standard safeguards that would have saved Delgado's life. After a nearly six-week trial in a personal injury lawsuit filed against the company, Harris County jurors awarded $21 million to Delgado's surviving family members and others injured in the explosion.
But thanks to tort reform and the state's Fourteenth Court of Appeals, that verdict was overturned last week in a decision that some attorneys and workplace safety experts fear could effectively make plant owners immune from lawsuits over contractors injured or killed at their facilities, potentially endangering workers if safety protocols go lax without the threat of multimillion-dollar jury verdicts.
“The message that this court decision sends out is this: Worker beware,” said Michael Sawyer, a safety engineering expert hired by the attorneys representing Delgado's family to review the case. “To safety professionals like myself, it sends the message that your job function is not as critical as you think.”
The court's decision centers on a specific section of state law, Chapter 95 of the Texas Civil Practice & Remedies Code, which the Texas Legislature passed along with a series of other so-called tort reform measures in the mid-1990s. Chapter 95, by all accounts, was designed to protect landowners from frivolous lawsuits by contractors who injure themselves while working on their property. Under the law, landowners aren't liable for injuries sustained by independent contractors if the landowner didn't have “actual knowledge” of the hazardous conditions that led to the worker's injury or death.
In the case of Oiltanking Houston and the explosion that killed Delgado and maimed three others, the appeals court determined that the company didn't have “actual knowledge” that the conditions on site put Delgado and his coworkers in serious danger. Which was surprising news for the jury foreman who sat through Oiltanking's six-week civil trial in 2013, who called the court's decision and reasoning “Kafka-esque.”
The jury foreman (who asked that we not use his name) ran through some of the details that were noted in Oiltanking's OSHA citations – that the pipe being welded on hadn't been thoroughly cleaned of flammable material and wasn't periodically tested for hazardous gasses, fumes and vapors. Under its contract with the welders, Oiltanking was responsible for making preparations on the pipe and taking such safety precautions. “It looked like a real disregard for safety,” the foreman said.
While OSHA and experts hired by the plaintiffs say hydrocarbons must have leaked from behind a plumbing cap Oiltanking's workers had used to cork the pipe (flammable fluid, they argue, that wouldn't have been there had the pipe been adequately cleaned), the company laid out an alternate theory in its appeal that essentially blames Delgado for the explosion that killed him.
In its appeal, the company says its experts have concluded that Delgado for some unexplained reason removed a venting hose on the plumbing cap, which allowed for flammable gases to escape into the work area. To jurors (11 out of 12 of them, at least), that explanation fell flat. As the foreman explained: “It was obvious from all the character witnesses that he (Delgado) was a very thoughtful guy, that he'd been doing this for over 20 years. What 20-year welder would dislocate a hose like that as he lights an arc? It just didn't make sense.”
What worries Robert Kwok, who represented Delgado's family at trial, is what he calls the impossibly high bar the court set for holding companies accountable when a contractor is killed or maimed because of safety precautions a facility failed to implement.
“So under this decision, plant owners need only tell their workers not to clean or air test and when asked if the condition is dangerous, say they don’t know,” Kwok wrote in an email. “In short, plausible deniability will carry the day – if you never gas test or adequately clean for hot work, you will never have 'actual knowledge' of any problem that can cause injury/death.”
Russell Hollenbeck, one of Oiltanking's attorneys on the case, wouldn't talk on record about the case. He provided us the same statement he gave Texas Lawyer, which first reported the appellate court's ruling: "We believe the decision of the Fourteenth Court of Appeals followed the law on the issues. Our clients are gratified by the results and the decision of the Fourteenth Court of Appeals." The Delgado family will likely appeal the court's decision. 
Delgado's son, Alberto, says that after his father's death, he slipped into a malaise that lasted for nearly two years. As he put it, “It was just work, school, bed…I couldn't concentrate, couldn't really do much else.”  Alberto, who's now 24 and a student at the University of Houston-Downtown, says his father, who immigrated from Mexico, enjoyed his work as a welder, but wanted more for his kids. He always talked about Alberto and his two youngest siblings going to college.
Alberto says his family was stunned not just by his father's death but by how it happened. “He always told us it wasn't that dangerous, I think, because he was trying to be positive. He didn't want to scare us,” Alberto said. “The trial was very upsetting. We'd expected all these procedures to be in place so nothing like this happens, but that wasn't the case.”

Three of Javier Delgado's brothers were also working at the Oiltanking facility the day of the explosion. One of Delgado's brothers was so close to the blast that he was among those injured. Witnesses at the facility testified that they saw him running around the plant after the explosion, covered in blood and brain matter, trying to find his other two brothers. 



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A by product of our failed war on drugs.

72-year-old honorably discharged veteran deported after 50 years in America




Private First Class Andres De Leon,72, signed up for the U.S. Army to fight in Vietnam when he turned 18-years-old at a time many were trying to avoid the war. He served for 12 years and spent two full years overseas before being honorably discharged. Like many veterans, he suffers from depression, that spiraled out of control when his mother passed away. But unlike most veterans, his depression led to him being deported.
De Leon may have moved to Madera, California with his family legally when he was 12-years-old but he was deported when he became addicted to heroin to medicate his depression and was eventually arrested for possession. Section 237 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (I.N.A.) lists this as a valid reason for deportation and three years into his sentence at Soledad State Prison, ICE came knocking.
By 2009, an immigration judge ordered De Leon back to Mexico where he hasn’t lived for over 50 years. He’s living in Tijuana today in a one room apartment after spending his first few weeks homeless and on the streets. With no friends or family and certainly no veterans benefits, his sister fears that his type-2 diabetes isn’t being taken care of.
“I got no choice,” he told a local TV station Fox40 back home. “I have to stay here but I’m doing the best I can.”
His story is sad enough and you would think that there aren’t many like him, but you’d be wrong. Once back in Mexico he met Hector Barajas, a former paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne who told De Leon there were dozens like them. In 2013, Barajas started a safe house for veterans from the United States that are deported to Mexico.
“We believe none of these men should be left behind,” he said. “We talk about supporting the troops, let’s keep supporting these men. Treat these men with honor.”
One in six veterans who served in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq suffer from a substance abuse issue. Those veterans who seek treatment for PTSD report alcohol-use disorders to the tune of 60 to 80 percent, according to the National Center for PTSD.
De Leon, Barajas and their friends are victims of cracks in a complicated system.Justice For Vets is an organization that works to help veterans that end up in the courts because of drug and alcohol abuse. They work with veteran treatment courtsthat require mandatory treatment and court appearances to help incentivize veterans to get clean and sober. But immigrants aren’t eligible if they break the law. They’re simply deported.
“I’ve been told the only way I can return is dead. So, if dead is the only way I can return, I would like to be buried with my friends in the Catholic Cemetery in Madera, California,” De Leon said.
“Why would they honor us only when we die? They’re going to give an American flag to our families and say, ‘Thank you for your service to your country,'” Barajas said. “If you want to honor our men, let them get their treatment. Let them live with their families.”
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What is the "Texas 10"?  
We're glad you asked.

The "Texas 10" is a series of photographic workshops that will be held throughout the state between the end of February and mid-April. Workshops are taught by volunteer TPPA Members who are willing to share and promote the success of all photographers throughout Texas (and beyond). These one-day workshops are offered locally to photographers of all skill levels.

You do not have to be a member of PPA or TPPA to register for Texas 10 workshops. However, PPA Members attending any "Texas 10" workshop will also receive one merit from PPA.

Because many of the workshops are hosted in the photographer's own studio, most of the workshops have a very limited capacity which also ensures everyone has an opportunity to work with the instructor and to ask questions. Take one workshop or take them all! Secure your spot today in any of the "Texas 10" workshops.












The price of each workshop is $89 for TPPA Members or $99 for Non-TPPA Members.
For more information visit the TPPA Website.


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Of course, it no longer matters what a majority of Americans want.

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Craig Washington WILL APPEAR ON:
RED, WHITE AND BLUE
Produced by Houston Public Media/PBS, Red, White and Blue is a weekly half-hour political affairs program covering local, state and national politics. David A. Jones and Gary Polland host the show with moderator Laurie Johnson. The program airs locally on Channel 8 Fridays at 7:30 pm and Saturdays at 6:30 pm and is taped at the Melcher Center for Public Broadcasting on the University of Houston Main Campus. We expect our guests to be able to discuss and comment on a multitude of issues that relate to the chosen topic.
FRIDAY, 02-05-16 AT 7:30 P.M., and
SATURDAY, 02-06-16 AT 6;30 P.M.
IT IS MY HOPE THAT YOU WILL FIND THE DISCUSSION INTERESTING.......


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Here comes the knight! Charles makes Van Morrison a sir at Buckingham Palace


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Meet the 5 friends who have attended every single Super Bowl



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Washington Lawmaker Needs To Know If Visiting Students Are Virgins

by Darren Smith
By Darren Smith, Weekend Contributor
Mary Dye
Mary Dye
Washington State Rep. Mary Dye of Pomeroy seems to have a curious interest concerning students visiting the state capitol--they should be questioned as to their virginity.
As part of a visit to the Washington State Capitol, Planned Parenthood's annual Teen Lobbying Day participants met with Representative Dye to advocate bills proposing the expansion of insurance coverage for birth control. But it seemed that our representative wanted a little more information than expected.
It apparently was necessary for these teenagers to disclose their sexual activities to Washington's self-appointed Virgin Tester.
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Martin Shkreli In His Own Words

by Darren Smith
By Darren Smith, Weekend Contributor
shkreli-smirkFormer pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli proudly continues his tenure as the industry's greatest pariah. Speaking before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee during a hearing on prescription drug prices, Mr. Shkreli displayed what can only be described as utter contempt for the proceeding and his own hubris.
Mr. Shkreli invoked his Fifth Amendment rights when questioned by the committee, which of course is his right, but throughout the committee's questioning he demeaned representatives with gestures such as rolling his eyes, playing with a pencil, and giving smirks. It is certain to garner almost equally the infamy of those smirks of Bernie Madoff.

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