Monday, April 11, 2016

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House Speaker Paul D. Ryan addressed the AIPAC conference in Washington, D.C., in March. Mr. Ryan gives regular speeches on politics and policy.
Paul Ryan, a Mirage Candidate, Wages a Parallel Campaign

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

The speaker of the House is already deep into a national campaign - one he calls "Confident America" - but it is not necessarily aimed at the presidency.

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The Rich Live Longer Everywhere. For the Poor, Geography Matters.

By NEIL IRWIN and QUOCTRUNG BUI

In some parts of the country, adults with the lowest incomes die on average as young as people in much poorer nations like Rwanda, and their life spans are getting shorter.



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Julie

















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Indiana Trooper Fired After Continuing To Question Drivers About Their Faith

by jonathanturley
1460086488403The Indiana State Police has fired a controversial trooper who had been sued twice in the past 18 months for allegedly preaching to citizens after traffic stops. Senior Trooper Brian Hamilton, 40, was a 14-year veteran of the agency.

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Sunbathing Woman Run Over By Police Truck In Grand Isle

by jonathanturley
20103650-largeIn another case of alleged negligence by beach security or police, Lindsey Gordon, 24, is suing the Grand Isle police after being run over by a police vehicle while sunbathing on the beach. We have previously discussedthis all-too-common type of accident.


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Kentucky Derby Party Cancelled For “Recreating An Antebellum South Atmosphere”

by jonathanturley
250px-Derby220px-Dartmouth_College_shield.svgWe have been discussing the battle over free speech on colleges and universities, particularly with the rise of protests and/or sanctions over "microaggressions" and speech deemed insulting or disparaging to any group. The latest such controversy is at Dartmouth College where a Kentucky Derby party hosted by Kappa Delta Epsilon was cancelled after protests that it was a racist demonstration. The objections however seem disconnected to the historical record of the race.


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Vanessa






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President Clinton signing the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 at the White House. He has since distanced himself from some of the more worrisome parts of the law.
Prison Rate Was Rising Years Before 1994 Law

By ERIK ECKHOLM

For some critics, the crime bill epitomizes policies that sent incarceration to record levels. History and statistics tell a more complex story, according to criminologists.



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Clinton Campaign Accuses Sanders of Trying to Win Nomination

NEW YORK (The Borowitz Report)—The war of words between the two Democratic camps heated up over the weekend, as the Clinton campaign accused Vermont Senator Bernie…

CONTINUE READING »



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SEC Charges Ken Paxton With Securities Fraud


Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is shown at a news conference in Austin on Jan. 13, 2016, to announce a new unit of the attorney general’s office dedicated to combating human trafficking.
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is shown at a news conference in Austin on Jan. 13, 2016, to announce a new unit of the attorney general’s office dedicated to combating human trafficking.


Editor's note: This story has been updated throughout.
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has been charged in federal court with allegedly misleading investors in a technology company. 
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed the charges Monday in a Sherman-based court. They are similar to the allegations Paxton faces in a pending indictment handed up by a Collin County grand jury last year.
(Read more about Ken Paxton's legal battles here.)
Paxton is named in the SEC's complaint along with William Mapp, the founder and former CEO of Servergy Inc. Paxton is accused of raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for Servergy without disclosing he was making a commission. The case stems from when Paxton was a member of the Texas House — before he was elected attorney general in 2014.
"People recruiting investors have a legal obligation to disclose any compensation they are receiving to promote a stock, and we allege that Paxton and White concealed the compensation they were receiving for touting Servergy’s product," Shamoil T. Shipchandler, director of the SEC’s Fort Worth regional office, said in a news release on the complaint.
Paxton has pleaded not guilty to the three felony counts he faces in the criminal case.
Bill Mateja, an attorney for Paxton, said that Paxton's legal team has not reviewed the SEC's civil lawsuit.
"As with the criminal matter, Mr. Paxton vehemently denies the allegations in the civil lawsuit and looks forward not only to all of the facts coming out, but also to establishing his innocence in both the civil and criminal matters."
According to the SEC, Paxton persuaded five investors to put $840,000 into Servergy — and did so without attempting to confirm Mapp’s claims about the sales of its data servers and their technological capabilities. A month later, Paxton received 100,000 shares of stock in the company.
In marketing materials and investment presentations, the Servergy CEO said he had preorders for the servers from the online retailer Amazon, the semiconductor giant Freescale, and the Canadian software engineering firm Koerr. He also maintained that an independent testing laboratory had found the product needed up to 80 percent less cooling, energy and space compared with other servers on the market. All of those assertions were untrue, according to the SEC filing.
Paxton pitched the company to his “friends, business associates, law firm clients” as well as members of his investment group. Among those in the investment group who later bought shares in Servergy was Paxton's colleague in the Texas House, state Rep. Byron Cook, R-Corsicana.
“Based on prior dealings in the group, members trusted each other to consider the interests of the group as a whole and not exploit one another for a member's personal benefit. Similarly, prior experiences in the group established that the member who recommended an investment would monitor the investment going forward and represent the group's interests,” the filing states. “Despite a duty to do so, Paxton knowingly or recklessly failed to inform any member of the investment group that he was being compensated by Servergy for recruiting investors.”
The SEC said Paxton told investigators that the shares were a gift from Mapp, not necessarily a commission. According to the complaint, Paxton claimed he accepted the shares only after Mapp refused to accept an offer from Paxton to invest $100,000 of his own money in Servergy.
“I can’t take your money. God doesn’t want me to take your money,” Mapp told Paxton during a meeting at a Dairy Queen during the summer of 2011 in McKinney, according to the SEC.
In May 2014, the state securities board fined Paxton for similar conduct. At that time, Paxton, who was then running for attorney general, admitted he solicited clients for an investment firm without disclosing that he would be paid a percentage of the fees the firm collected from their business. 
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kasey











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